Bitter Campari (jester), 1921

Cappiello, Leonetto poster: Bitter Campari (jester)

As Art Nouveau lost its energy around 1900, an Italian named Leonetto Cappiello arrived in Paris to create a new approach that would dominate Parisian poster art until Art Deco's arrival in the late 1920s. Using the energy of Cheret and the caricature of Toulouse-Lautrec as his models, Cappiello focused on creating one simple image, often humorous or bizarre, which would immediately capture the viewer's attention.

One of Cappiello's most irresistible images was this famous Campari poster, which features a jester rising from an orange peel. Early on, Campari was mixed with seltzer. By the Twenties, with the rise of the cocktail and more female drinkers, Campari promoted drinking the aperitif with a splash of orange, hence the theme of this poster. The concept lived up to Cappiello's one-line credo of poster art: "Surprise is the foundation of advertising; it is its necessary condition."

Cappiello spent most of his adult life in Paris where his inspired metaphors for more than 500 posters made him one of the greatest product posterists of all time.

Cappiello, Leonetto

27.5 x 40 inches (70 x 102 cm)

Lithograph | Backed on linen

Inventory #ITL07196

KEYWORDS:
humor
beverages
1920s
medium
clowns
italy
europe
aperitifs
Cappiello Style
Italy
orange
black
green