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Affordable Classics: Posters for the New Collector

March 24 through April 30, 2015

 

International Poster Gallery proudly presents Affordable Classics: Posters for the New Collector, a show and sale of 50 original vintage posters under $2,500 that reveal why the field remains one of the best for newcomers. The show features fine examples from several styles, subjects and eras to indicate the incredible breadth of opportunities for any budding collector or home decorator. The show will highlight several of the most interesting areas:

 

Art Deco has never been more popular than today, from its earliest luxurious beginnings in France from about 1909 through the 1920s, to a modern streamlined and mechanistic style in the 1930s and 1940s. A stunning example of French Art Deco is Charles Loupot's Fourrures Canton. First issued in 1924, with color variations, it was popular right up to its final edition in 1949. Another striking poster is the 1948 Atelier Perceval poster for Air France with a hippocampus, a mythical seahorse that was Air France's logo, emerging from the reflections of the spinning airplane propeller.

 

A strong area of interest with many opportunities for new collectors is the Mid-Century style of the 1950s and 1960s. Two distinct styles emerged post-World War II, fed by the Baby Boom and the rise of international consumer brands. The first, which some today call "Madmen" style after the popular television series, was brightly colored and whimsical. One of the most successful series was created by California artist David Klein for TWA.  His ingenious poster for Las Vegas, 1957, is an iconic example of the hip "Ratpack" era. 

 

Another perennial 1960s favorite is the original poster for 3 Days of Peace & Music - Woodstock, 1969 by Arnold Skolnick. Reproduced, reprinted and satirized hundreds of times, the original is a valuable collector's item and hard to find. The other dominant Mid-Century style that emerged has been dubbed the International Typographic Style or Swiss Style. More orderly and rational, it often conveyed its message through the innovative use of typography. One of the most notable series of posters in this style was created by the Swiss typographic master Josef Muller-Brockman for the chamber orchestra Musica Viva from the late 1950s through the early 1970s.

 

Travel and transportation posters from around the globe are another blockbuster poster category, and the gallery has over 1500 examples from the birth of the travel poster from the 1890s to the present. Classic examples include Daniele Buzzi's colorful poster for Locarno, 1926; Austin Cooper's exotic design, See India, c. 1930; and The Largest Ships to and From California, 1929 by L. Wulff for Panama Pacific ocean liners.  

 

The show features numerous other categories, as well as a number of smaller graphics, many already framed and available for under $100. Vintage luggage labels are a hugely popular category, especially for newcomers. Worldly individuals were given the chance to show off their adventures, all the while serving as walking billboards.  

Affordable Classics: Posters for the New Collector

March 24 through April 30, 2015

 

International Poster Gallery proudly presents Affordable Classics: Posters for the New Collector, a show and sale of 50 original vintage posters under $2,500 that reveal why the field remains one of the best for newcomers. The show features fine examples from several styles, subjects and eras to indicate the incredible breadth of opportunities for any budding collector or home decorator. The show will highlight several of the most interesting areas:

 

Art Deco has never been more popular than today, from its earliest luxurious beginnings in France from about 1909 through the 1920s, to a modern streamlined and mechanistic style in the 1930s and 1940s. A stunning example of French Art Deco is Charles Loupot's Fourrures Canton. First issued in 1924, with color variations, it was popular right up to its final edition in 1949. Another striking poster is the 1948 Atelier Perceval poster for Air France with a hippocampus, a mythical seahorse that was Air France's logo, emerging from the reflections of the spinning airplane propeller.

 

A strong area of interest with many opportunities for new collectors is the Mid-Century style of the 1950s and 1960s. Two distinct styles emerged post-World War II, fed by the Baby Boom and the rise of international consumer brands. The first, which some today call "Madmen" style after the popular television series, was brightly colored and whimsical. One of the most successful series was created by California artist David Klein for TWA.  His ingenious poster for Las Vegas, 1957, is an iconic example of the hip "Ratpack" era. 

 

Another perennial 1960s favorite is the original poster for 3 Days of Peace & Music - Woodstock, 1969 by Arnold Skolnick. Reproduced, reprinted and satirized hundreds of times, the original is a valuable collector's item and hard to find. The other dominant Mid-Century style that emerged has been dubbed the International Typographic Style or Swiss Style. More orderly and rational, it often conveyed its message through the innovative use of typography. One of the most notable series of posters in this style was created by the Swiss typographic master Josef Muller-Brockman for the chamber orchestra Musica Viva from the late 1950s through the early 1970s.

 

Travel and transportation posters from around the globe are another blockbuster poster category, and the gallery has over 1500 examples from the birth of the travel poster from the 1890s to the present. Classic examples include Daniele Buzzi's colorful poster for Locarno, 1926; Austin Cooper's exotic design, See India, c. 1930; and The Largest Ships to and From California, 1929 by L. Wulff for Panama Pacific ocean liners.  

 

The show features numerous other categories, as well as a number of smaller graphics, many already framed and available for under $100. Vintage luggage labels are a hugely popular category, especially for newcomers. Worldly individuals were given the chance to show off their adventures, all the while serving as walking billboards.